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Henry Wilcoxon
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Actor
    (September 8, 1905-March 6, 1984)
    Born in Roseau, Dominica
    Birth name was Harry Wilcoxon
    Appeared in the films ‘The Perfect Lady’ (1931), ‘Cleopatra’ (1934), ‘The Crusades’ (1935), ‘The Last of the Mohicans’ (1936), ‘The Mysterious Mr. Moto’ (1938), ‘That Hamilton Woman’ (1941), ‘Scotland Yard’ (1941), ‘Mrs. Miniver’ (1942), ‘Unconquered’ (1947), ‘A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court’ (1949), ‘Samson and Delilah’ (1949), ‘The Miniver Story’ (1950), ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ (1952), ‘The Ten Commandments’ (1956), ‘Man in the Wilderness’ (1971), ‘Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood’ (1976), ‘The Man with Bogart’s Face’ (1978) and ‘Caddyshack’ (1980)
    When he signed with Paramount, the studio decided ‘Harry’ was not distinguished enough and changed his name to ‘Henry.’
    His two marriages both ended in divorce, with his the first one barely lasting a year.
    As Richard the Lion-Hearted in ‘The Crusades,’ he is on the receiving end of one of the all-time great bad movie lines, Loretta Young’s ‘You just gotta save Christianity, Richard! You gotta!’
    His acting career slowed significantly after the death of Cecil B. DeMille.
    After his mother died when he was one, his father sent him and his brother Owen to a foster home, where they were locked in an attic room and fed leftovers.
    By the time they were rescued, both boys had lice and Henry was suffering from rickets.
    During the filming of ‘That Hamilton Woman,’ Laurence Olivier’s wig caught fire and Wilcoxon burned his hands putting out the blaze.
    He joined the US Coast Guard during World War II.
    He and director William Wyler extensively rewrote the sermon he delivers as the vicar in ‘Mrs. Miniver,’ producing such a morale booster that it was printed on propaganda leaflets dropped over occupied Europe.

Credit: C. Fishel


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