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Burleigh Grimes
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Baseball Player
    (August 18, 1893-December 6, 1985)
    Born in Emerald, Wisconsin
    Pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1916-17,1928-29,1934), Brooklyn Dodgers (1918-26), New York Giants (1927), Boston Braves (1930), St. Louis Cardinals (1930-31,1933-34), Chicago Cubs (1932-33) and New York Yankees (1934)
    When the spitball was banned, was one of 17 pitchers grandfathered in and allowed to continue using it
    Was the longest-lasting of the 17, making him the last pitcher to legally throw a spitball
    270 wins, 212 losses
    3.53 career ERA
    1,512 strikeouts
    Managed the Brooklyn Dodgers (1937-38)
    131 wins, 171 losses
    Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee (1964)
    He got off to a rocky start during his first stint with the Pirates, including notching a 13-game losing streak his sophomore season.
    He was nicknamed 'Ol' Stubblebeard' because he would not shave for a couple of days before he pitched.
    He had a reputation as a 'headhunter' whose 'idea of an intentional walk was to throw four fastballs at the batter's head.'
    He beaned Goose Goslin when Goslin was still in the on-deck circle.
    He was fined for swearing at Brooklyn manager Wilbert Robinson during a tirade in which he accused his infield of lax play (1922).
    As a minor-league manager, he was suspended the remainder of the season after spitting on an umpire (1940).
    Unlike most pitchers, he was a decent batter, and was even occasionally used as a pinch hitter.
    He led the National League twice in wins (1921,1928) and once in strikeouts (1921).
    In Game Seven of the 1931 World Series, he pitched eight shutout innings despite an inflamed appendix that required him to be iced down between innings.
    He had a baseball career that spanned six decades, including managing, coaching and scouting.
    As a scout for the Baltimore Orioles, he discovered Jim Palmer.

Credit: C. Fishel


    In 2018, Out of 1 Votes: 100% Annoying
    In 2017, Out of 1 Votes: 100% Annoying
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